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January 15, 2008

Comments

Runolfr

Do you have a good supply of dance tabulations, my dear? We can definitely help you with that. We can also point you to music sources, such as http://sca.uwaterloo.ca/Music/.

You might want to join the mailing list: saltare_guild-subscribe@yahoogroups.com.

Melbrigda

Greet, go back to your ballet background and how when you learned a choreographed piece you had "music memory" to remember your movements. Think hours and hours of hearing Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and how you can remember exactly what movements you do just from the melody. It helps to listen to music often to get the melody and phrasing in your head. It helps make many of these dances more accessible to learn.

I can burn you a copy of the dance music I have and get it to you next time I see you. I also have directions as well for many dances.

Eoin

I think you would really enjoy any of the period dance manuals, but especially Arbeau's Orchesographie, which includes very clear (charmingly curmudgeonly) descriptions of all the steps and how they fit into choreographies, which are given alongside the musical tabulation. Orchesographie is the primary source for bransles, and some other good stuff.

Plus, only $12 in paperback from the dealer of your choice.

You are right, only repetition will ultimately provide the familiarity you need with both verbal vocabulary and muscle memory. But with your background, it will come very quickly once you get to have some regular exposure. Practice and discussion with other humans is best, but individual practice and reading helps too.

Eoin

I think you would really enjoy any of the period dance manuals, but especially Arbeau's Orchesographie, which includes very clear (charmingly curmudgeonly) descriptions of all the steps and how they fit into choreographies, which are given alongside the musical tabulation. Orchesographie is the primary source for bransles, and some other good stuff.

Plus, only $12 in paperback from the dealer of your choice.

You are right, only repetition will ultimately provide the familiarity you need with both verbal vocabulary and muscle memory. But with your background, it will come very quickly once you get to have some regular exposure. Practice and discussion with other humans is best, but individual practice and reading helps too.

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